ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Do serum and urinary concentrations of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 in healthy newborns depend on birth weight, gestational age or gender?
MONIKA KAMIANOWSKA MAREK SZCZEPAńSKI ELżBIETA EWA KULIKOWSKA BARBARA BEBKO ANNA WASILEWSKA

1- Department of Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland
2- Department of Pediatrics and Nephrology, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland
 
Introduction:

Determination of renal function in neonates can be challenging. Firstly, it is difficult to obtain timed urine samples, and blood sampling requires skills. Secondly, the renal function of normal infants is known to change considerably during the 1st year of age. Thirdly, the renal function of children up to 1 year of age should not be assessed from urine flow rate, as in this age group, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) corrected for body size is not comparable with normal adult values. All this stimulated research on biochemical markers that could be determined in untimed urine samples and predict changes in renal function. The aim of work was to establish the normal levels of serum and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) in healthy full-term newborns.

Material and methods:

Male and female newborns, as well as children in whom the samples were obtained in the first or second day of life, did not differ significantly in terms of their sKIM-1 and uKIM-1 levels. Gestational age correlated inversely with sKIM-1 and positively with uKIM-1.

Results:

Male and female newborns, as well as children in whom the samples were obtained in the first or second day of life, did not differ significantly in terms of their sKIM-1 and uKIM-1 levels. Gestational age correlated inversely with sKIM-1 and positively with uKIM-1.

Conclusions:

This is the first report of sKIM-1 and uKIM-1 levels in healthy full-term newborns during the first postnatal days. sKIM-1 and uKIM-1 levels correlate with gestational age, but not with birthweight and gender.