ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORING PARAMETERS IN OBESE AND NON-OBESE HYPERTENSIVE CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
Belde Kasap Demir 1 Eren Soyaltın 2 Caner Alparslan 2 Ender Can 2 Fatma Mutlubaş 2 Demet Alaygut 2 Önder Yavaşcan 2

1- IZMIR KATIP CELEBI UNIVERSITY PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY CLINIC
2- IZMIR TEPECIK TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY CLINIC
 
Introduction:

 We aim to asses the effect of obesity on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring(ABPM) parameters in officially hypertensive children and adolescents.    

Material and methods:

 Children and adolescents who have BP measurements>95p on three different occasions in office measurements and referred for ABPM between January 2010 and December 2013 were included into the study. Children with secondary hypertension and those with solitary kidneys were excluded. Patients with a BMI ≥95p were grouped as obese and those with <95p were grouped as non-obese. Age, gender, prematurity, height SDS, urea, serum creatinine, uric acid, left ventricular mass index(LVMI), hypertensive retinopathy(HTRP) findings and proteinuria levels were recorded. As patients were in the different age groups, SDS levels were calculated for APBM measurements including 24 hour, daytime and nighttime systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively). Laboratory and clinical findings and ABPM values were compared between the two groups.  

Results:

 There were 266 (M/F:148/118) patients with primary hypertension. Of those, 192 were obese and 72 were non-obese; and 24 (7 obese and 17 non-obese) had white coat hypertension. Age, gender, birth weight, urea, serum creatinine levels were similar between the groups. Prematurity, height SDS, uric acid and LVMI were higher in the obese group; however, ratio of hyperuricamia, LVH and HTRP levels were similar between the groups. The rate of WCH is higher in the non-obese group. 24 hour, daytime and nighttime SBP, DBP and MAP levels were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.01). Systolic dipping is lower in obese patients (p:0.01). When patients with WCH were excluded, the results remained the same. 

Conclusions:

 In officially hypertensive children and adolescents, WCH is more common in non-obese patients and obesity is associated with higher ABPM parameters irrelevant to WCH.