ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Stress, anxiety and depression in parents of children with chronic kidney disease
ELKE DE BRUYNE 1 CHARLOTTE VAN HERZEELE 1 EVELIEN SNAUWAERT 2 ELS HOLVOET 3 ANN RAES 2 WIM VAN BIESEN 3 LIESBET GOUBERT 4 ELINE VAN HOECKE 1 SUNNY ELOOT 3 JOHAN VANDE WALLE 2

1- DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC PSYCHOLOGY, GHENT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, BELGIUM
2- DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY, GHENT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, BELGIUM
3- DEPARTMENT OF NEPHROLOGY, GHENT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, BELGIUM
4- DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL-CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, GHENT UNIVERSITY, BELGIUM
 
Introduction:

The quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is impaired. However, little is known about the impact on the family. The aim of this study was to explore the psychological wellbeing in this parent group with special emphasis on socio-demographic variables, parental stress, anxiety and depression.

Material and methods:

Thirty-six parents (27 mothers) of children with CKD completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, 2 questionnaires assessing parental stress (Parenting Stress Index - Short Form (PSI-SF) and Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP)), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measuring symptoms of anxiety and depression. 

Results:

The socio-demographic questionnaire revealed that half of the parents (18/36) perceives a deterioration of their own health since the CKD diagnosis of their child. In 17/36 families, at least one of the parents reduced work activities due to the CKD diagnosis. Regarding general parental stress (PSI-SF), parents generated scores within the normal range (59 ± 23; normal range 43 – 61). The disease related parental stress measurement (PIP) showed the highest stress level on the domain ‘emotional distress’ (42 ± 13) and equal stress levels (22) on the 3 other domains ‘communication’, ‘medical care’, and ‘role function’. Parents reported mild symptoms of anxiety (8 ± 4) but normal symptoms of depression (5 ± 4). Exploring the relation between all measurements of parenting stress, anxiety and depression, overall significant correlations could be found (correlation coefficients between r=0.51 and r=0.69; p < 0.01).    

Conclusions:

CKD in children does not only affect the child itself. Parents of CKD patients report more health problems since the diagnosis of their child, and a suggestive presence of anxiety problems can be seen. Normal but rather high mean levels of parental stress can be found. As the impact of CKD goes beyond the child and affects the entire family, a multidisciplinary family-based therapy is recommended.