ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Impact of salt and potassium intake on blood pressure in obese children
ALPER SOYLU 1 SEÇIL ARSLANSOYU ÇAMLAR 1 BETÜL TEKINALP 1 ECENUR DURSUN 1 AYŞE NUR YILDIRIM 1 SALIH KAVUKCU 1

1- DOKUZ EYLÜL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY
 
Introduction:

 Obesity and high salt intake are the two most important modifiable risk factors for hypertension. Higher salt intake has been associated with higher systolic blood pressure (BP) in obese children, but not in non-obese children. The impact of dietary salt intake on BP is affected by consumption of potassium. The urine Na/K ratio is a stronger correlate of BP than either sodium or potassium alone. The aim of this study was to determine if there was a difference in salt and potassium intake between obese children with or without hypertension.

Material and methods:

 A total of 34 obese children (22 male) aged 12.6±2.8 (6.9-17.2) years were evaluated. Anthropometric measurements and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring were performed. Estimated salt intake and potassium consumption were determined by 24-h urinary sodium and potassium excretion, respectively. Children with hypertension were compared with normotensive children with respect to gender, age, BMI z-score, urine Na,K, Na/K ratio and estimated daily salt intake. In addition, correlation of urine sodium and urine sodium/potassium to casual and ambulatory BP values were evaluated.

Results:

 The average estimated salt intake  was 9.6±4.3 g/day and it was not different between the hypertensive and normotensive children. Salt intake exceeded the upper limit of the US Dietary Reference Intake in 82% of children. Hypertensive and normotensive children were not different with respect to age, gender, BMI z-score, urine Na, K and Na/K ratio. Estimated salt intake and urine Na/K level were not correlated with ambulatory BP levels. However, office systolic BP measurements were correlated with estimated salt intake (r=0.431, p=0.011). 

Conclusions:

 Our results demonstrate an extremely high salt intake among obese Turkish children. Although hypertensive and normotensive obese children had similar salt and potassium intake, higher salt intake was associated with higher casual systolic BP. Thus, dietary salt reduction interventions along with obesity control programs should be implemented as early as possible.