ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Familial labial adhesion
ILKE BEYITLER 1 SALIH KAVUKCU 1

1- DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NEAR EAST UNIVERSITY, NICOSIA, NORTH CYPRUS
 
Introduction:

 Introduction:

Labial  adhesion,  also  known  as  labial  fusion,  labial  synechiae  or  labial  agglutination,  is  the  partial  or  total  fusion  of  labia  minora  in  prepubertal  girls,  most  commonly  in  3  months - 3  years  age  group.  The  condition  may  be  asymptomatic  or  result  in  urinary  tract  infection (UTI),  postvoid  dripping  or  obstruction.  Although  the  etiology  is  not  clear,  vulvar  irritation,  poor  hygiene  or  excessive  cleaning  may  be  responsible.  Familial  labial  adhesion  has  not  yet  been  reported  in  the  literature.  

Material and methods:

 Case report:

We  present  a  three  year  old  girl  evaluated  for  recurrent  UTIs  and  found  to  have  labial  fusion  that  did  not  disappear  with  topical  estrogen.  Surgical  separation  was  needed  after  which  UTIs  stopped.  Her  16  months  old  sister  also  had  labial  fusion  without  any  symptoms  that  disappeared  with  topical  estrogen.  We  do  not  know  if  this  is  a  coincidence  or  not.  

Results:

 Discussion:

Maternal  estrogen  insufficiency  was  previously  believed  to  cause  neonatal  labial  adhesions  which  disappear  in  puberty.  However  estrogen  levels  of  children  with  and  without  labial  adhesions  were  compared  in  a  study  demonstrating  no  difference,  so  hypoestrogenic  theory  is  no  longer  accepted.  Familial  labial  adhesion  cannot  be  thought  as  an  analogous  of  androgen  insensitivity  syndrome  seen  in  familial  hipospadias.  As  labial  adhesions  disappear  with  intense  estrogen  treatment,  it  may  be  speculated  that  there  may  be  estrogen  insufficiency  or  estrogen  insensitivity  in  local  tissues  of  these  children.  Androgen  insensitivity  is  defined  for  testosterone  but  there  is  not  a  study  concerning  estrogen.  Association  of  labial  adhesion  and  familial  phimosis  that  is  not  physiological  is  also  not  defined  in  literature  too.  As  the  presented  sisters  do  not  have  a  brother,  we  are  not  able  to  query  about  this.  The  mother  of  these  children  may  had  similar  complaints  in  childhood  but  this  is  not  stated  by  her.  As  a  result,  labial  adhesion  in  two  sisters  has  brought  in  mind  a  possible  familial  predisposition  of  the  condition. 

 

Conclusions:

 .