ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Prenatal alcohol exposure affects renal function in schoolchildren
LIANE CORREIA-COSTA 1 FRANZ SCHAEFER 2 ALBERTO CALDAS AFONSO 1 SOFIA CORREIA 3 JOãO TIAGO GUIMARãES 4 ANTóNIO GUERRA 5 HENRIQUE BARROS 3 ANA AZEVEDO 3

1- EPIUNIT - INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL; DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY, INTEGRATED PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL, CENTRO HOSPITALAR SãO JOãO, PORTO, PORTUGAL; DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL
2- DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY, CENTER FOR PEDIATRICS AND ADOLESCENT MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF HEIDELBERG, HEIDELBERG, GERMANY
3- EPIUNIT - INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL; DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, PREDICTIVE MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL
4- EPIUNIT - INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL; DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY, CENTRO HOSPITALAR SÃO JOÃO & DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL
5- DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PORTO, PORTUGAL; DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC NUTRITION, INTEGRATED PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL, CENTRO HOSPITALAR SãO JOãO, PORTO, PORTUGAL
 
Introduction:

Prenatal ethanol exposure was shown to reduce nephron endowment in animal models but the effect of alcohol consumption during human pregnancy on postnatal kidney function has not been explored. We assessed in a prospective longitudinal study a potential association of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy with the renal function of the offspring, taking into account potential confounders such as intrauterine growth and the children’s current nutritional status.

Material and methods:

A random sample of 1,093 children from a population-based birth cohort was evaluated. Mother’s alcohol consumption during pregnancy was self-reported at baseline. Anthropometrics and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed at 7 years of age. The association of gestational alcohol exposure with renal function in childhood was assessed by multiple linear regression analysis, adjusting for gender, current age, birth weight adequacy for gestational age, and maternal age, years of school education, pre-pregnancy nutritional status and smoking during pregnancy. 

Results:

Thirteen percent of mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy. At 7 years of age, eGFR was significantly lower in children with prenatal alcohol exposure (134±17 vs.138±16 mL/min/1.73 m2, p=0.014). The effect was dose dependent and most marked in overweight and obese children, among whom adjusted eGFR was -6.6 (-12.0 to -1.1) ml/min/1.73 m2 in children exposed to ≤40g alcohol per week and -11.1 (-21.3 to -1.2) ml/min/1.73 m2 in those exposed to >40g per week compared to no consumption (p for trend=0.002)

Conclusions:

Prenatal alcohol exposure has a dose-dependent adverse effect on renal function at school age in overweight and obese children.