ESPN 50th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2017


 
Use of Herbal and Dietary Supplements in Children with Kidney and Urinary Tract Disease
TUGBA TASTEMEL OZTURK 1 ELIF OZMERT 1 NURAY KANBUR 1 BORA GULHAN 1 FATIH OZALTIN 1 REZAN TOPALOGLU 1 ALI D√úZOVA 1

1- HACETTEPE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, ANKARA, TURKEY
 
Introduction:

Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children is as common as in adults. We aimed to determine the frequency of herbal and dietary supplements (HDS) in children with kidney and urinary tract disease, and to define associated factors.

Material and methods:

201 patients (48.3% F; 10.0±3.2 years) with kidney and urinary tract disease in a tertiary center were included; control group consisted of 200 healthy children (10.5±5.1 years). Information was obtained through questionnaires and examination of patient records. 

Results:

The frequency of HDS use in patient group and control group were 38.9% and 57.0%, respectively (p< 0.001). Fish oil was widely used in the population (patient group 16%, control group 38%), when use of fish oil was excluded the frequency of HDS use was comparable (patient group 28.9%, control group 26.0%; p: 0.52). In the patient group the main reason to use HDS was to treat kidney disease (42%); followed to increase immunity and treat upper respiratory tract infections, and to increase appetite. Disease duration, total length of stay in hospital and number of drugs used were increased (p<0.05) in patients who used HDS (fish oil excluded). HDS use was higher among patients with an eGFR<90 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or on renal replacement therapy (36.3% vs. 24.0%; p: 0.06). Residential areas and the educational status of the parents had no significant effects. In both patient and control groups, main information sources for HDS were the friends-relatives and the internet; 12% had first acquired information for HDS from a healthcare professional. Among HDS users, 59% do not share with their doctors that they use these products; and 92% are aware of that HDS may have side effects.

Conclusions:

Considering possible side effects, the use of HDS should be questioned on routine visits in all patients, with a special focus on the ones with longer disease duration and total length of stay in hospital, and higher number of drugs used.